SPARSH TEEN CHALLENGE- the MIRACLES

Human Trafficking in India has been a continuing tragedy in India since the time of the Peshwa, 1749 to 1818. In Pune, prostitution has grown with industrialization and urbanization. Over the last few decades, the escalating crisis of trafficking women and children is a national stigma.
Trafficking affects a large number of girls and families. In poor homes in India, many cannot afford to eat even 2 meals a day. Families, lured by the "dream" of sufficient food, clothes and shelter, even just the basic necessities, are trapped by the lies of unscrupulous impostors who promise a dream but deliver a nightmare. Most innocent girls think they are coming to the city to learn computer skills but find themselves trapped, compelled to become prostitutes to release their family from the bondage of their debt. Shipping containers, like the one to the left, become the lifellong prison for women trapped in human trafficking in Pune.
Maahi was born into poverty and sold into slavery. Her mother died when she was five. A friend that had custody sold her to a brothel. At 8 years old, they started using her for the sex trade. When she was unable to entertain customers, she was beaten with iron rods and given alcohol and drugs. She escaped and fled to Pune with her daughter, Nandini. Maahi hated selling her body for survival and she came to a place called Kondhwa NIBM Road. This is where Timothy and Joyce found Maahi & her daughter, Nandini, now 6 years old.
The street, surrounded by pain, was home for Nandini, Maahi's oldest daughter. Nandini first came to TC after Tim and Joyce found her on the street banging on car doors, begging for food and money at the traffic signals. Then a year later, as Nandini pleaded for her mother, Maahi, her mother came in off the street.
Years of wounding and pain and the need for healing have made ministering to women coming from the streets a real challenge. Right now, Maahi truly needs our prayers. Please stand with us for restoration of this beautiful family.

 

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